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Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

3 edition of Climatic changes, ice sheet dynamics, and sea level variations found in the catalog.

Climatic changes, ice sheet dynamics, and sea level variations

Kolumban Hutter

Climatic changes, ice sheet dynamics, and sea level variations

by Kolumban Hutter

  • 27 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by Verlag der Fachvereine, Geographisches Institut, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich in Zürich .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Climatic changes.,
  • Glacial epoch.,
  • Sea level.,
  • Atmospheric chemistry.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementK. Hutter, H. Blatter, A. Ohmura.
    SeriesZürcher geographische Schriften ;, Heft 37
    ContributionsBlatter, Heinz., Ohmura, Atsumu.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQC981.8.C5 H88 1990
    The Physical Object
    Pagination83 p. :
    Number of Pages83
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1966567M
    ISBN 103728117536
    LC Control Number90200966

      Sea level rise is a natural consequence of the warming of our planet. We know this from basic physics. When water heats up, it expands. So when the ocean warms, sea level rises. When ice is exposed to heat, it melts. And when ice on land melts and water runs into the ocean, sea level rises. This projection of future sea-level rise is based only on the satellite-observed changes over the last 25 y, assuming that sea level changes similarly in the future. If sea level begins changing more rapidly, for example due to rapid changes in ice sheet dynamics, then this simple extrapolation will likely represent a conservative lower bound.

      The losses from the ice sheets and mountain glaciers have contributed to sea level rise. Globally sea levels rose by roughly 6 inches in the 20th century, and the oceans are now rising more than.   Holocene Climate Variability in Antarctica Based on 11 Ice-Core Isotopic Records - Volume 54 Issue 3 - Valérie Masson, Françoise Vimeux, Jean Jouzel, Vin Morgan, Marc Delmotte, Philippe Ciais, Claus Hammer, Sigfus Johnsen, Vladimir Ya. Lipenkov, E. Mosley-Thompson, Jean-Robert Petit, Eric J. Steig, Michel Stievenard, Rein Vaikmae.

    During the past 42 million years, the Earth has operated as an “icehouse” world where global changes in sea level resulted from the successive formation and melting of continental ice sheets. When ice sheets melt, water is returned to the ocean and sea level rises. When ice sheets expand, water is withdrawn from the ocean and sea level falls. Concerns about their sensitivity to climate change were centered on air temperature and on glacially paced ice dynamics. Southern Ocean roles were relegated to iceberg transport, a mix of melting and freezing under ice shelves buffered by the frigid shelf waters generated by sea ice production, and slow sea level rise by other forcing.


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Climatic changes, ice sheet dynamics, and sea level variations by Kolumban Hutter Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Climatic changes, ice sheet dynamics, and sea level variations. [Kolumban Hutter; Heinz Blatter; Atsumu Ohmura]. Changes in basal shear stress distributions in the vicinity of the grounding line inevitably cause variations in ice flow and its flux through the grounding line.

This triggers its migration, with consequent changes in ice discharge to the ocean, and the glaciers’ contribution to sea level. Ice-Shelf Dynamics. Shaped by orbital variations, responses such as the rise and fall of continental ice sheets and significant sea-level changes helped create the climate.

Other changes, including Heinrich events, Dansgaard–Oeschger events and the Younger Dryas, however, illustrate how glacial variations may also influence climate without the Climatic changes forcing.

Future sea-level rise is an important issue related to the continuing buildup of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, with the potential to raise sea level ∼70 meters if completely melted, dominate uncertainties in projected sea-level change.

Freshwater fluxes from these ice sheets also may affect oceanic circulation, contributing to climate by: er words, sea-level change is far from uniform. Sea level inthe sense usedhere, alsoknown asrelativesea level (RSL), is defined as the difference in elevation between sea-surface height (SSH) and the height of the solid-Earth surface.

SSH, also called geocentric sea level, is defined with —theparameterthatmat-Cited by: Climate changes impact the mass balance of ice sheets, ice caps, and local glaciers and have direct and indirect consequences on sea-level position (Alley et al., ).

Contemporary sea level is rising in response to current global warming and is expected to accelerate through the twenty-first century (Church et al. ).Mass balance variations of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) play an important role in these sea level variations.

Sincethe Gravity Ice sheet dynamics and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has enabled monitoring of the terrestrial water cycle, ice sheet and glacier mass balance, sea level change.

Relative Sea-Level Change. Recent progress in understanding sea-level change has seen concepts of glacio-isostasy and glacio-eustasy refined with respect to orbital forcing of climate change involving cycles of 10 1 –10 6 years, and changes attributable to tectonic forcing better constrained over longer time-scales.

At shorter time. Sea-level changes are the main mechanism controlling facies dynamics, stratal geometry, and temporal variations in fossil assemblages in marine sedimentary basins. Besides having a direct influence on the water depth sea-level changes could serve as a trigger for various oceanographic, climatic, sedimentary, chemical, and biotic events.

Mass balance variations of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) play an important role in these sea level variations. Over the last two decades they explain around 18% of the contemporary sea level rise, and by the end of the twenty-first century, they are expected to explain 17% ± 11% of the total sea level rise (Church et al.

Data from NASA's GRACE and GRACE Follow-On satellites show that the land ice sheets in both Antarctica (upper chart) and Greenland (lower chart) have been losing mass since The GRACE mission concluded science operations in June GRACE.

Confidence in projections of global mean sea level rise has increased since the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) because of the improved physical understanding of the components of sea level, the improved agreement of process-based models with observations, and the inclusion of ice-sheet dynamical changes.

Past Sea Level Change. Milankovitch cycles describe the collective effects of changes in the Earth's movements on its climate over thousands of years. The term is named for Serbian geophysicist and astronomer Milutin the s, he hypothesized that variations in eccentricity, axial tilt, and precession resulted in cyclical variation in the solar radiation reaching the Earth, and that this orbital.

Synopsis. While the incident wave climate is the dominant process variable controlling changes in coastal form and evolution, changes in the relative level of the land and the water body, on a variety of time scales, can greatly influence the effect of these processes and the. SEA-LEVEL RISE AND COASTAL STABILITY.

Climate change will lead to rising sea levels in the Arctic Ocean (Proshutinsky et al., ) and other northern seas. Climate warming affects global sea level through ocean thermal expansion and additional water transfers to the ocean basins from melting glaciers and ice sheets.

Ice sheet dynamics describe the motion within large bodies of ice, such those currently on Greenland and motion is dominated by the movement of glaciers, whose gravity-driven activity is controlled by two main variable factors: the temperature and strength of their bases.A number of processes alter these two factors, resulting in cyclic surges of activity interspersed with.

National Security Implications of Climate Change for U.S may have been underestimated in the last IPCC report and that major changes in Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet dynamics can take place over relatively short timescales.

Sea-level variations caused by shifts in wind, rain, evaporation, and land-ice volume can cause far greater local. Short-term response of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to climatic warming up to the year a.d.

Ice volume changes were transformed into global sea level changes assuming an ice density of kg m −3 and a constant oceanic surface area of × 10 8 km 2, or 71% of the earth’s surface.

Bold text refers to Greenland, italic. Q&A 1 IS THE CLIMATE WARMING?. Yes. Earth’s average surface air temperature has increased by about 1 °C ( °F) sincewith over half of the increase occurring since the mids [].A wide range of other observations (such as reduced Arctic sea ice extent and increased ocean heat content) and indications from the natural world (such as poleward shifts of temperature-sensitive.

The Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) and its outlying ice caps were losing mass at a rate of about − Gt/y in earlybut y later this rate had increased nearly fourfold to about − Gt/y, accounting for much of the observed acceleration in sea level rise.A Heinrich event is a natural phenomenon in which large groups of icebergs break off from glaciers and traverse the North Atlantic.

First described by marine geologist Hartmut Heinrich (Heinrich, H., ), they occurred during five of the last seven glacial periods over the pastyears (Hodell, et al., ). Heinrich events are particularly well documented for the last glacial period.

It shows the widening spread in outcomes for one parameter, grounding-line retreat, from 10 simulations each of different internal climate variations in the minimal model.

For comparison, the green band shows results for a bed sloping toward the sea, which doesn’t allow for the marine ice-sheet .